The154th
The Kimura Tsunehisa Exhibition: "What?"

Tsunehisa Kimura / Hiroshi Kashiwagi
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KIMURA:
The montages on exhibition represent a kind of relativity image, a case model on the phenomenon of the railway platform. A station platform is a patchwork of diverse vectors where vagabonds of differing stances cross each other's paths. It's a place where, bewilderment aside, the individual reveries of people who have no inherent need to meet, travelers each having their own destinations, overlap. It's from that overlapping that their "karma" of fortuitous coincidence arises. Montages, one might say, are like a stage on which an allegory of eleventh-hour karmic relativity unfolds. Think tanks embracing key players of the era are, in many cases, reservoirs of "knowledge" gathered from various order systems. The synergetic effects of the crossbreeding of various colliding genres sets off a chemical reaction. Their point of ignition appears to create differentials of imaginative power. Infusing the creative imagination with a breath of freshness is a sense of unit-rejecting creolization dampened by mono culture. The railway platform is a venue for cultural studies respective of creolization, and I am the stationmaster. "Next stop, Kashiwagi Station."
KASHIWAGI:
You've done an extremely fine job at creating a montage of words. Lately I have been reading essays by Shu Fujisawa, whose writings show the influence of William Burroughs. Burroughs' writings evolve like this. First, he writes. Then he takes a scissors to what he has written and patches the pieces together at random. This results in a continuous, nonsensical unfolding of images. To my mind, in your case you create shocking phenomena by patching visual images together. The montage could perhaps change the world. To reorganize the world is to have the world in the palm of your hand. To me, the montage seems to be imbued with a variety of issues. Your works, I believe, have focused on the twentieth century itself. Whenever I see your works, I'm always reminded of Walter Benjamin. Benjamin was of the opinion that the modern world is a dream world, a phantasmagoria. He states that what is important is to accept the illusion. This is precisely your realm. What I found extremely interesting at this latest exhibition is the lighting. It's probably because of the lighting that I had the sensation of watching a movie in suspended motion, itself like a phantasmagoria. It made me think how strangely distorted and peculiar the twentieth century had been.
KIMURA:
In Burrough's video, there's a scene of a collage, a pasting together of newspaper headlines. When he stares into them, the headline changes, and he gazes again. "Wow ! " I thought. "That's just like me ! " Toward the end Burroughs talks about the urge to try killing someone before he dies. He's a sexy nihilist. They say the moment of murder is the supreme erection.
KASHIWAGI:
He has killed his wife, hasn't he.
KIMURA:
Burroughs is a dadaist. After the tragedy of the first World War, the dadaist poets were strongly driven at that turning point in time and dreamed of a new variety of verbal genesis. The future language they targeted was infant babble, the kind spoken by Pikachu. Babble is man's first words, and because babble, the dawn of language, is something spoken unconsciously, it belongs to no mother tongue. It's a kind of creolized environment. The poetic experiments of dadaism deriving from collages of news headlines or advertising copy are, I think, a simulation probing the creolized phenomenon of verbal genesis. Dadaism is the forefather of montage. My montages are scribblings in imitation of dadaism: dadaistic doodles for children. To borrow the dying words of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, a phantasmagoria is " a dream beyond a dream." Hedeyoshi's urban plan formed the basic model of the city of Osaka. Benjamin held closely to Haussmann's grand plan for Paris. The waterfront project at Nakanoshima, on a sandbar in the Yodo River, sought to remodel the area along the lines of Haussmann's plan, with the Yodo River corresponding to the banks of the Seine. Hideyoshi's plan forms a creolized, hybrid zone with overlapping scenery from Paris. If Benjamin and Hideyoshi were to pen a linked verse on that scenery, the first line, by Benjamin, would say "Phantasmagoria." Hideyoshi would then complete the verse with the two lines, "City of Osaka / A dream beyond a dream."
KASHIWAGI:
That makes for a great montage !
KIMURA:
During infanthood, when one has zero linguistic awareness, a mother's voice, a dog's bark, a cat's meow and even the chirping of insects all reverberate equally as "words." The basic data presented in montages is a monologue too. What matters is the way it reverberates. When I was a child, I was crazy about movies. I'd go and see three of them in a row, and then be unable to distinguish among them. If a friend would press me to tell him what I thought about them, I'd extract the good parts from each and transform them into one film all jumbled together.
KASHIWAGI:
You had to make a montage !
KIMURA:
Along the lines of an innocent love tale between Achako and Marilyn Monroe. Then my friend would go see the movie for himself, and come back complaining there was no such film as the one I'd described. Movies are a model of cross-cultural democracy, the democracy of a virtual movie of scrambled contents.
KASHIWAGI:
Benjamin said the roots of cinematography lie not so much in photography as in panorama. I think the reason the works of Tsunehisa Kimura are in the spotlight today is because they're about the twentieth century. One final point I'd like to add is this: that just as a phantasmagoria is an illusion, so too the realm of montage is an illusion. The twentieth century was a period in which we attempted to learn the source and meaning of our illusions.
Lecture scenery
Lecture scenery

(C)Tsunehisa Kimura
(C)Tsunehisa Kimura
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