Louvre - DNP Museum Lab Art Appreciation System Adopted by the Louvre

To commence operations at the Department of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities

Sep25,2014

Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. (DNP) is pleased to announce the adoption of three art appreciation systems developed under the auspices of the Louvre - DNP Museum Lab, a joint project between DNP and the Musée du Louvre, by the Department of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities at the Musée du Louvre in Paris. The newly introduced system will go into operation from September 24, 2014. Following on from similar installations at the Department of Decorative Arts in 2011, Department of Egyptian Antiquities in 2012, and the Department of Paintings in 2013, this marks the fourth occasion, and the eight joint developed art appreciation system have been installed at the Louvre.

[Background to Adoption of Art Appreciation System]

Since its inception in October 2006, DNP and the Musée du Louvre have promoted the joint project Louvre - DNP Museum Lab, designed to aid the exploration of new forms of art appreciation. With solutions to art appreciation challenges faced by the Musée du Louvre as its point of departure, the system was developed using DNP information and imaging technology. By utilizing these technologies, the art appreciation system allows visitors to gain a deeper appreciation of art works from the Musée du Louvre collection on periodic display at the dedicated space provided at the DNP Gotanda Building in Tokyo. To date 10 exhibitions have been hosted, and have developed a firm reputation from the approximately 90,000 visitors who have used the available IT to enjoy an unprecedented art appreciation experience.

The art appreciation system adopted by the Musée du Louvre on this occasion comprises three systems from among the eight developed for our tenth presentation, entitled A Masterpiece of Ancient Greece: a World of Men, Gods and Heroes, designed to celebrate the civilization and art of ancient Greece. The adoption of these systems by the Department of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities, is in line with the reorganization the Greek art section, part of the Grand Louvre Project, an all embracing project aiming to improve the visiting environment, beginning with the famous glass pyramid. Some six million visitors file through the ancient Greek arts exhibition area each year, the highest number for any Greek collection on the planet. This, however, has led to demands for solutions to challenges including how to help visitors familiarize themselves with Greek art, improving usability so as to be able to cater to diverse visitors from a range of different cultural backgrounds, and the provision of information that creates a sense of integration with the exhibition space.

[Overview of Three Art Appreciation Systems]

1.  The World of Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece boasts of a history in excess of 1,000 years, and which covered a region far greater than that of present day Greece. Arts and crafts that were influenced by ancient Greece enjoyed significant development, and innovation. The art appreciation system has been installed at the entrance to the viewing course of the Department of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities permanent exhibition. And with the objective of putting into motion the viewing of the ancient Greek arts exhibition area, can provide a summary, of approximately four-minutes in length, via a video program introducing geographical, historical background information that serves as an initial contact for understanding the exhibited works of art.

Installed at the Denon wing, lower ground floor room 3  

2.  A Masterpiece of Ancient Greece: a World of Men, Gods and Heroes

With this art appreciation system, it is possible to take those familiar gods of ancient Greece, such as Aphrodite and Apollo, and learn techniques for identifying them from their respective visual attributes. The art appreciation system has been installed in the Venus de Milo room, the busiest zone in the museum. And by presenting a visual design that does not rely on text, and devising an intuitive interface, the system can be used in just a short time and also cater to diverse visitors from a range of different cultural backgrounds.

Installed at the Sully wing, ground floor room 14

3.  "Krater of Antaeus" - a Masterpiece of Greek pottery

Developed as an appreciation assistance tool, for "Krater of Antaeus," this art system was the first of its type to integrate explanatory equipment with the exhibition case, and also to be installed at the Musée du Louvre under the theme of compatibility between appreciation of the exhibits and the provision of relevant information. This art appreciation system allows the reader to freely manipulate 3D images on a touch panel display placed in front of the artwork, itself, and refer to the provided information. As a result, this system helps promote the double action of seeing and knowing the artwork in question. It is also possible to observe the important portions of the artwork with high definition imagery, prompting the desire to confirm these findings with the naked eye, as the system guides the observer's line of sight towards the artwork. This art appreciation system has been installed in the Campana Gallery, said to be one of the most historical rooms in the museum.

Installed at the Sully wing, 1st floor room 43

[Record of Art Appreciation System Adoption by the Louvre and Future Installation Plans]

First Installation: June 2011

Two art appreciation systems dealing with Sèvres porcelain were installed in the Department of Decorative Arts, following their development for the 7th presentation at the Louvre - DNP Museum Lab, entitled Diplomacy and Sèvres Porcelain, Prestige and the French art of Living in the 18th Century.

Installed at the Richelieu Wing 1st floor, rooms 93 and 95.

* In line with the renewed opening of the "From Louis XIV to Louis XVI, the art of French living" galleries, the system has been relocated to room 60 on the 1st floor of the Sully wing.

Second Installation: June 2012

Two art appreciation systems allowing visitors to study how to view the art of ancient Egypt were installed in the Department of Egyptian Equities, following their development for the 8th presentation entitled Offerings for Eternity in Ancient Egypt: a Question of Survival.

Installed at the Sully Wing 1st floor, rooms 21 and 23.

Third Installation: July 2013

Two art appreciation systems installed in the Department of Paintings, offering explanations of the Spanish art collection housed at the Musée du Louvre following their development for the 9th presentation at the Louvre - DNP Museum Lab, entitled El Nino Azul, Goya and Spanish Painting in the Louvre.

Installed at the Denon Wing 1st floor, rooms 25 and 26.

Fourth Installation: Planned for September 2014

Three art appreciation systems are set to be installed in the Department of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities permanent exhibition that aim to promote an understanding of ancient Grecian art, following the 10th presentation at the Louvre - DNP Museum Lab, entitled A Masterpiece of Ancient Greece: a World of Men, Gods and Heroes.

Installed at three locations in the Denon Wing, including the Venus de Milo room.

 

At left, second installation: System for the appreciation of ancient Egyptian arts
At right, third installation: System for the appreciation of Spanish art collection

DNP will continue to deploy such art appreciation systems at exhibitions and events at the Musée du Louvre, and other art galleries and museums, aiming to promote usage of the successful developments created by the Louvre - DNP Museum Lab.

 
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